Carnegie Mellon Human Computer Interaction Institute

Masters of Human Computer Interaction
2006 Projects

HCII :: Masters Capstone Projects :: 2006 Projects

Emerson Process Management
Emerson Assets Project site
HCI Group at NASA Ames Research Center
Team NASA 2006 Project site
Google
Socialstream Project site

Emerson Assets

Applying a user-centered design process, the team conducted research about the installation process of AMS Asset Portal in order to discover needs and requirements for a tool to facilitate the installation process and customizing AMS Asset Portal.

Team NASA 2006

The goal of this project was to design and develop an efficient interfaces for robotic activity planning for use by multiple people.

Socialstream

The goal of this project was to rethink and reinvent social networking online. Primarily, it explored how online social networks could bring greater value to users, especially for ages above twenty.


MEDRAD
MEDRAD Project site
Pittsburgh Voyager
Voyager Project site
DeltaV Digital Automation System
DeltaV Project site

MEDRAD Electronic Lab Notebook

Using a user-centric research and design process, the goal of this project was to explore how the Innovations Group at MEDRAD work and to design a system to help them create and document intellectual property to be used in the creation of patents for medical imaging devices.

Pittsburgh Voyager Searchlight

The goal of this project was to determine how technology could enhance the on-boat experience for Pittsburgh Voyager instructors and students.

Emerson DeltaV

We were challenged by Emerson Process Management to make their process control software, DeltaV, easier for plant operators to use. Guided by our user research, after several rounds of prototype iteration and user testing, our final design allows users to quickly analyze historical process data, making plant control more efficient.

HCII :: Masters Capstone Projects :: 2006 Projects

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